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Chronological List of Relevant Muslim and Christian Scholars Who Wrote on Contagion in the Premodern Period

 
  • Ibn Sahl b. Rabbān al-Ṭabarī (d. after 240/ 855), Christian doctor who converted to Islam; lived in Sāmarrā’.
  • Ibn Qutayba (d. 276 / 889), theologian, traditionist, and jurist; lived much of his life in Baghdad.
  • Thābit b. Qurra (d. 288/ 901), doctor, mathematician, and astronomer from Ḥarrān; flourished and died in Baghdad.
  • Muḥammad b. Zakariyyā al-Rāzī (d. 311/ 923), doctor and student of the natural sciences in general; born and died in Rayy, spent many years in Baghdad.
  • Al- Khaṭṭābī (d. 338/ 998), traditionist, hadith commentator, and poet from Bust (in southern Afghanistan).
  • Ibn Sīnā (d. 428/ 1037), philosopher and doctor from Bukhara; died in Hamadan.
  • Ibn Baṭṭāl (d. 449/ 1057), traditionist and hadith commentator from Cordoba.
  • Ibn ʿAbd al-Barr (d. 463/ 1070), traditionist and jurist from Cordoba.
  • Al- Bājī (d. 474/ 1081), theologian and jurist from Badajoz; died in Almería.
  • Ibn Rushd al-Jadd (d. 520/ 1126), jurist and judge from Cordoba; grandfather of the philosopher.
  • Al- Māzarī (d. 536/ 1141), jurist and hadith commentator from al-Mahdiyya in Ifrīqiya.
  • Ibn al-ʿArabī (d. 543/ 1148), traditionist and jurist from Seville; buried in Fez.
  • ʿIyāḍ b. Mūsā (d. 544/ 1149), jurist from Ceuta; died in Marrakesh.
  • Ibn al-Ṣalāḥ (d. 643/ 1245), traditionist and jurist from Shahrazūr (on the border of Iraq and Iran); died in Damascus.
  • Abū ʿAbbās Aḥmad b. ʿUmar al- Qurṭūbī (d. 656/ 1258), jurist, traditionist, and hadith commentator from Cordoba; died in Alexandria.
  • Abū ʿAbdāllah Muḥammad b. Aḥmad al- Qurṭūbī (d. 671/ 1273), traditionist and Qur’anic exegete from Cordoba; died in Upper Egypt.
  • Al- Nawawī (d. 676/ 1277), jurist, traditionist, and hadith commentator from Nawā, near Damascus.
  • Ibn Abī Jamra al-Andalusī (d. 699/ 1300), traditionist and ascetic; place of birth and death unknown.
  • ʿUmar al-Sakūnī al-Ishbīlī (d. 717/ 1317), theologian and jurist; lived and died in Tunis.
  • Shams al-Dīn al-Dhahabī (d. 748/ 1348), traditionist and jurist; lived and died in Damascus.
  • Ibn al-Wardī (d. 749/ 1349), jurist and poet from Maʿarrat al-Nuʿman; died in Aleppo.
  • Ibn Qayyim al-Jawziyya (d. 751/ 1350), theologian and jurist; lived and died in Damascus.
  • Ibn Mufl iḥ al-Maqdisī (d. 763/ 1362), jurist and legal theorist; lived and died in Damascus.
  • Ibn Khātima (d. 770/ 1369), jurist and physician from Almería.
  • Ibn al-Khaṭīb (d. 776/ 1374), jurist, physician, and Sufi ; fl ourished in Granada and died in Fez.
  • Ibn Abī Ḥajalah (d. 776/ 1375), poet, prose writer, and Sufi from Tilimsān; died near Cairo.
  • Ibn Lubb (d. 782/ 1381), jurist and judge; lived and taught in Granada.
  • Al- Manbijī (d. 785/ 1383), jurist and traditionist from Syria.
  • Al- Kirmānī (d. 786/ 1384), jurist, theologian, and hadith commentator; died on pilgrimage and was buried in Baghdad.
  • Al- Shāṭibī (d. 790/ 1388), jurist and legal theorist; was born and died in Granada. Al- Ubbī (d. 827/ 1425), traditionist, jurist, and hadith commentator; lived in Algeria.
  • Ibn Ḥajar al-ʿAsqalānī (d. 852/ 1448), traditionist, jurist, and judge; born and died in Cairo.
  • Al- ʿAynī (d. 855/ 1451), jurist, hadith commentator, and judge from ʿAynṭāb in Syria; flourished and died in Cairo.
  • Al- Raṣṣāʿ (d. 894/ 1489), jurist, doctor, and judge from Tlemcen; died in Tunis.
  • Al- Sanūsī (d. 895/ 1490), theologian, Sufi , and doctor; was born and died in Tlemcen.
  • Al- Mawwāq (d. 897/ 1492), jurist and judge; died in Granada.
  • Al- Qasṭallānī (d. 923/ 1517), traditionist, hadith commentator, and theologian; was born and died in Cairo.
  • Al- Yūsī (d. 1102/ 1691), jurist, Sufi , and theologian from near Sefrou; died in Fez.
  • Al- Zurqānī (d. 1122/ 1710), jurist and traditionist; was born and died in Cairo.
  • Muḥammad b. Aḥmad al-Ḥājj (d. 1128/ 1715), jurist and traditionist; was born and died in Fez.
  • Aḥmad b. Mubārak al-Sijilmāsī al-Lamṭī (d. 1156/ 1743), Sufi and jurist; lived in Fez.
  • Abū ʿAbd Allāh Muḥammad al-Shabbī al-Ḥāmidī al-Sūsī (d. 1163/ 1749), doctor.
  • Muḥammad b. al-Ḥasan al-Banānī (d. 1194/ 1780), jurist and preacher; died in Fez.
  • Aḥmad Ibn ʿAjība (d. 1224/ 1809), Sufi and jurist from al-Khamīs, near Tangiers; died in Zammīdj (also near Tangiers).
  • Muḥammad b. Aḥmad al-Rahūnī (d. 1230/ 1814), Moroccan jurist.
  • Muḥammad b. Abī al-Qāsim al-Fīlālī (al-Filālī) (d. after 1252/ 1836), jurist from Sijilmāsa; died in Rabat.
  • Ḥamdān b. ʿUthmān Khoja (d. ca. 1258/ 1842), Algerian jurist; died in Istanbul.
  • Muḥammad b. al-Madanī b. ʿAlī Junūn (d. 1302/ 1884), Moroccan Sufi and jurist.
  • Al- Gharisī (d. 1313/ 1895), jurist and poet from Tlemcen; died in Morocco.
  • Cyprian (d. 258), bishop of Carthage; lived and died in Carthage.
  • Ambrosiaster (fourth century), name given to an anonymous author, previously thought to be Ambrose (d. 397).
  • Jerome (d. 420), biblical translator and theologian from Stridon in Dalmatia; died near Bethlehem.
  • Isidore of Seville (d. 636), bishop and historian; fl ourished in Seville.
  • Beato of Liebana (d. 798), Cantabrian monk; wrote a commentary on the book of Revelation.
  • Qusṭā ibn Lūqā (d. 297/ 910 or 308/ 920), doctor; lived in Baghdad and died in Armenia.
  • Haymo Halberstatensis (d. 850), Benedictine monk and bishop of Halberstadt.
  • Rupert of Deutz (d. ca. 1130– 35), monk and theologian from Liège; became abbot of Deutz and served there until his death.
  • Hervé de Bourg Dieu (d. 1150), Benedictine monk and biblical exegete; died near Tours.
  • Richard of Saint Victor (d. 1173), theologian and mystic of the abbey of Saint Victor in Paris; lived and died in Paris.
  • Thomas Aquinas (d. 1274), theologian from Roccasecca in Italy; died in Fossanova, near Rome.
  • Alfonso X (d. 1284), king of Castile and León; born in Toledo, died in Seville.
  • Alfonso of Cordoba (fl . 1348), physician from Cordoba.
  • Jacme d’Agramont (d. 1348), physician and professor of medicine at Lleida (in Catalonia); died in Lleida.
  • Anonymous Practitioner of Montpellier (fl . 1349).
  • Gui de Chauliac (d. 1368), physician; died in Avignon.
  • Vincent Ferrer (d. 1419), Dominican preacher from Valencia; died in Brittany.
  • Alonso de Chirino (d. between 1429 and 1431), converso Castilian physician.
  • Enrique de Villena (d. 1434), Castilian noble and humanist.
  • Alfonso Fernández de Madrigal (El Tostado) (d. 1455), professor of theology and bishop of Avilá; died in Avilá.

 

source : Infectious Ideas – Justin K. Stearns