Chronological List of Relevant Muslim and Christian Scholars Who Wrote on Contagion in the Premodern Period

Chronological List of Relevant Muslim and Christian Scholars Who Wrote on Contagion in the Premodern Period

  • Ibn Sahl b. Rabbān al-Ṭabarī (d. after 240/ 855), Christian doctor who converted to Islam; lived in Sāmarrā’.
  • Ibn Qutayba (d. 276 / 889), theologian, traditionist, and jurist; lived much of his life in Baghdad.
  • Thābit b. Qurra (d. 288/ 901), doctor, mathematician, and astronomer from Ḥarrān; flourished and died in Baghdad.
  • Muḥammad b. Zakariyyā al-Rāzī (d. 311/ 923), doctor and student of the natural sciences in general; born and died in Rayy, spent many years in Baghdad.
  • Al- Khaṭṭābī (d. 338/ 998), traditionist, hadith commentator, and poet from Bust (in southern Afghanistan).
  • Ibn Sīnā (d. 428/ 1037), philosopher and doctor from Bukhara; died in Hamadan.
  • Ibn Baṭṭāl (d. 449/ 1057), traditionist and hadith commentator from Cordoba.
  • Ibn ʿAbd al-Barr (d. 463/ 1070), traditionist and jurist from Cordoba.
  • Al- Bājī (d. 474/ 1081), theologian and jurist from Badajoz; died in Almería.
  • Ibn Rushd al-Jadd (d. 520/ 1126), jurist and judge from Cordoba; grandfather of the philosopher.
  • Al- Māzarī (d. 536/ 1141), jurist and hadith commentator from al-Mahdiyya in Ifrīqiya.
  • Ibn al-ʿArabī (d. 543/ 1148), traditionist and jurist from Seville; buried in Fez.
  • ʿIyāḍ b. Mūsā (d. 544/ 1149), jurist from Ceuta; died in Marrakesh.
  • Ibn al-Ṣalāḥ (d. 643/ 1245), traditionist and jurist from Shahrazūr (on the border of Iraq and Iran); died in Damascus.
  • Abū ʿAbbās Aḥmad b. ʿUmar al- Qurṭūbī (d. 656/ 1258), jurist, traditionist, and hadith commentator from Cordoba; died in Alexandria.
  • Abū ʿAbdāllah Muḥammad b. Aḥmad al- Qurṭūbī (d. 671/ 1273), traditionist and Qur’anic exegete from Cordoba; died in Upper Egypt.
  • Al- Nawawī (d. 676/ 1277), jurist, traditionist, and hadith commentator from Nawā, near Damascus.
  • Ibn Abī Jamra al-Andalusī (d. 699/ 1300), traditionist and ascetic; place of birth and death unknown.
  • ʿUmar al-Sakūnī al-Ishbīlī (d. 717/ 1317), theologian and jurist; lived and died in Tunis.
  • Shams al-Dīn al-Dhahabī (d. 748/ 1348), traditionist and jurist; lived and died in Damascus.
  • Ibn al-Wardī (d. 749/ 1349), jurist and poet from Maʿarrat al-Nuʿman; died in Aleppo.
  • Ibn Qayyim al-Jawziyya (d. 751/ 1350), theologian and jurist; lived and died in Damascus.
  • Ibn Mufl iḥ al-Maqdisī (d. 763/ 1362), jurist and legal theorist; lived and died in Damascus.
  • Ibn Khātima (d. 770/ 1369), jurist and physician from Almería.
  • Ibn al-Khaṭīb (d. 776/ 1374), jurist, physician, and Sufi ; fl ourished in Granada and died in Fez.
  • Ibn Abī Ḥajalah (d. 776/ 1375), poet, prose writer, and Sufi from Tilimsān; died near Cairo.
  • Ibn Lubb (d. 782/ 1381), jurist and judge; lived and taught in Granada.
  • Al- Manbijī (d. 785/ 1383), jurist and traditionist from Syria.
  • Al- Kirmānī (d. 786/ 1384), jurist, theologian, and hadith commentator; died on pilgrimage and was buried in Baghdad.
  • Al- Shāṭibī (d. 790/ 1388), jurist and legal theorist; was born and died in Granada. Al- Ubbī (d. 827/ 1425), traditionist, jurist, and hadith commentator; lived in Algeria.
  • Ibn Ḥajar al-ʿAsqalānī (d. 852/ 1448), traditionist, jurist, and judge; born and died in Cairo.
  • Al- ʿAynī (d. 855/ 1451), jurist, hadith commentator, and judge from ʿAynṭāb in Syria; flourished and died in Cairo.
  • Al- Raṣṣāʿ (d. 894/ 1489), jurist, doctor, and judge from Tlemcen; died in Tunis.
  • Al- Sanūsī (d. 895/ 1490), theologian, Sufi , and doctor; was born and died in Tlemcen.
  • Al- Mawwāq (d. 897/ 1492), jurist and judge; died in Granada.
  • Al- Qasṭallānī (d. 923/ 1517), traditionist, hadith commentator, and theologian; was born and died in Cairo.
  • Al- Yūsī (d. 1102/ 1691), jurist, Sufi , and theologian from near Sefrou; died in Fez.
  • Al- Zurqānī (d. 1122/ 1710), jurist and traditionist; was born and died in Cairo.
  • Muḥammad b. Aḥmad al-Ḥājj (d. 1128/ 1715), jurist and traditionist; was born and died in Fez.
  • Aḥmad b. Mubārak al-Sijilmāsī al-Lamṭī (d. 1156/ 1743), Sufi and jurist; lived in Fez.
  • Abū ʿAbd Allāh Muḥammad al-Shabbī al-Ḥāmidī al-Sūsī (d. 1163/ 1749), doctor.
  • Muḥammad b. al-Ḥasan al-Banānī (d. 1194/ 1780), jurist and preacher; died in Fez.
  • Aḥmad Ibn ʿAjība (d. 1224/ 1809), Sufi and jurist from al-Khamīs, near Tangiers; died in Zammīdj (also near Tangiers).
  • Muḥammad b. Aḥmad al-Rahūnī (d. 1230/ 1814), Moroccan jurist.
  • Muḥammad b. Abī al-Qāsim al-Fīlālī (al-Filālī) (d. after 1252/ 1836), jurist from Sijilmāsa; died in Rabat.
  • Ḥamdān b. ʿUthmān Khoja (d. ca. 1258/ 1842), Algerian jurist; died in Istanbul.
  • Muḥammad b. al-Madanī b. ʿAlī Junūn (d. 1302/ 1884), Moroccan Sufi and jurist.
  • Al- Gharisī (d. 1313/ 1895), jurist and poet from Tlemcen; died in Morocco.
  • Cyprian (d. 258), bishop of Carthage; lived and died in Carthage.
  • Ambrosiaster (fourth century), name given to an anonymous author, previously thought to be Ambrose (d. 397).
  • Jerome (d. 420), biblical translator and theologian from Stridon in Dalmatia; died near Bethlehem.
  • Isidore of Seville (d. 636), bishop and historian; fl ourished in Seville.
  • Beato of Liebana (d. 798), Cantabrian monk; wrote a commentary on the book of Revelation.
  • Qusṭā ibn Lūqā (d. 297/ 910 or 308/ 920), doctor; lived in Baghdad and died in Armenia.
  • Haymo Halberstatensis (d. 850), Benedictine monk and bishop of Halberstadt.
  • Rupert of Deutz (d. ca. 1130– 35), monk and theologian from Liège; became abbot of Deutz and served there until his death.
  • Hervé de Bourg Dieu (d. 1150), Benedictine monk and biblical exegete; died near Tours.
  • Richard of Saint Victor (d. 1173), theologian and mystic of the abbey of Saint Victor in Paris; lived and died in Paris.
  • Thomas Aquinas (d. 1274), theologian from Roccasecca in Italy; died in Fossanova, near Rome.
  • Alfonso X (d. 1284), king of Castile and León; born in Toledo, died in Seville.
  • Alfonso of Cordoba (fl . 1348), physician from Cordoba.
  • Jacme d’Agramont (d. 1348), physician and professor of medicine at Lleida (in Catalonia); died in Lleida.
  • Anonymous Practitioner of Montpellier (fl . 1349).
  • Gui de Chauliac (d. 1368), physician; died in Avignon.
  • Vincent Ferrer (d. 1419), Dominican preacher from Valencia; died in Brittany.
  • Alonso de Chirino (d. between 1429 and 1431), converso Castilian physician.
  • Enrique de Villena (d. 1434), Castilian noble and humanist.
  • Alfonso Fernández de Madrigal (El Tostado) (d. 1455), professor of theology and bishop of Avilá; died in Avilá.

 

source : Infectious Ideas – Justin K. Stearns